Day 123

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1 Chronicles 23:1-25:31

Mike Garrett, Coordinator Financial Peace University

Within the Financial Peace University ministry, we recently completed “The Legacy Journey,” the new seven week follow up course to FPU. It is built on a four-step process of getting your basic finances under control (living on a budget, getting rid of debt, etc.), saving for the future, leaving a legacy for your family and giving generously to address the needs of the world around us.

The big “take-aways” from the program for me were the importance of the following: understanding that God owns everything we have and that we are only stewards of those resources, being content with whatever God has given us, being a generous giver, and that having everything organized can be one the best gifts you can leave your family after your death. To help with this last item, class participants were provided a “legacy box” with file folders for items such as wills, powers of attorney, insurance policies, birth certificates, social security cards, funeral instructions, tax returns, retirement accounts, investment accounts, pension information, titles, and passwords. One of the most meaningful items for me has been working on writing legacy letters to my family, which are also to be included in the “legacy box.”

In the beginning of 1 Chronicles 23, David gives Solomon the responsibility for being the King of Israel and for building the Temple. As the next few chapters unfold, you begin to see a beautiful picture of how thoroughly David has prepared for this transition. He has amassed the money and materials needed to build the temple and is now organizing the thousands of people needed to assure the completion of the temple and its successful ongoing operation once completed.

David leaves Solomon a tremendous legacy. His plans were carefully detailed and leaders appointed for the various responsibilities. Just like David, we also need to think about the coming generations.
What kind on legacy are you leaving your family and the world? Do you have a personal and family mission statement? What important lessons do you want to make sure your children understand? Do you have a current will? I’ll bet you have some work to do, too.

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8 responses »

  1. “At that time, when David saw that the LORD had answered him on the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite, he offered sacrifices there” – 1 Chronicles 21:28

    God, You continue to show up in unexpected places! Though You had established specific rules for worship and sacrifices to be held in the Tabernacle, You met David at a dirty threshing floor because of his immediate need – and You used his repentance as the foundation for the building of the Temple in Jerusalem. Not so surprising, then, that you eventually showed up in a manger! Lord, may I look for You in unexpected places in my life – especially the places I haven’t yet cleaned up for Your arrival.

  2. I was really struck today reading chapter 25. The musicians that David assembled had a job that I don’t usually associate with music: they prophesied. They didn’t just entertain, didn’t just lead the congregation – they “prophesied in giving thanks and praising the Lord”, they “prophesied under the direction of the king.” As a musician myself, this seems to me an awesome and fearful responsibility! To miss a note, to slur a word or two, maybe botch a rhythm — OK, so we’re all human. But to mess up a prophecy! That seems to add a whole lot of weight to the situation.

    Yet on the other hand, as the body of Christ on earth everything we do is speaking the character of God to the world around us. That’s a responsibility just as awesome and fearful as prophesying in the temple at Jerusalem. May we learn and rehearse and practice our lives as much as musicians practice their music. May our lives be a clear concert to the world and a joy to our Father.

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