Day 109

Standard

1 Samuel 30:1-31; 1 Chronicles 12:20-22; 1 Samuel 31:1-13; 1 Chronicles 10:1-14; 1 Chronicles 9:40-44; 2 Samuel 4:4; 2 Samuel 1:1- 27 (Message)

Jim Wilkens, Associate Pastor of Care / Director of JOURNEY

Specifically 1 Samuel 30:21-24

Today’s reading reminded me of a time, many years ago, when my parents arrived home from the grocery store in the middle of the day, to find their home being looted. The intruder was running out the front door as they came in the back. My dad hollered over his shoulder for my mom to “Call the police!” as he set out in pursuit.

Although on a different scale, David and 600 of his men returned to their homes and found them looted. They too set out to recover their belongings. Upon returning home with their possessions, those who fought alongside David against the Amalekites grumbled that the men who were “too tired to continue with him” should not receive any of the spoils.

Because David valued those too exhausted to keep up the pursuit of the Amalekite raiders as much as those who fought shoulder to shoulder with him, he said, “The share of the one who stays with the gear is the share of the one who fights—equal shares. Share and share alike!” Funny, “Share and share alike” was one of my Mom’s favorite phrases when my siblings and I were kids.

Most of us would certainly try to recover what had been stolen from us; most of us tend to feel cheated when we think someone else got more than they really deserved. There are a couple of New Testament events that connect here.
Consider the parable Jesus told of the landowner who went out to hire laborers to work his vineyard. After settling on a day’s-wage, he hired some workers. Then at three other times throughout the day this landowner employed additional workers. At the end of the day, those who had worked from the start were grumbling that they should receive much more than those who had not ‘earned’ a full day’s wage.

Jesus, the son of David—more importantly the Son of God—valued that repentant criminal, dying on the cross beside Him, no less than those who lived shoulder to shoulder with Him while He walked the earth.
Jesus, son of David—Son of God—thank you for loving each one of us equally. Your love is more than we deserve.

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4 responses »

  1. Thanks Jim,
    I like the fact that David had no involvement in the deaths of the royal family so he could take the throne. He knew that he himself was anointed but he refused to take the matter into his own hands.

    2 Sam. 1-16 When the Amalekite came to David claiming to have killed Saul, it would appear that he thought he would be rewarded for making it possible for David to take the throne. Instead David ordered his death for harming God’s anointed. (We know that this man was lying as Saul had committed suicide (1 Sam. 31:4 & 1 Chronicles 10:4)

  2. David, a man after God’s own heart, knew how to submit to God and trust in His plan and His timing. Father, thank You that You promise to complete the work You have begun to change my heart, renew my mind and direct my path all for Your glory.

  3. “The share of the one who stays with the gear is the share of the one who fights – equal shares.” (by David, after plundering a city) – 1 Sam. 30:25

    My first thought after reading these words were “blessed are the homemakers and stay-at-home moms!” Over the years, I sometimes struggled as I filled these roles…comparing myself with career women who got paychecks and applause by fighting on the front lines. The cycles of washing dishes, laundry, preparing meals, changing diapers, and umpiring sibling fights were at times tedious and exhausting. Now that I’m retired and have the benefit of hindsight, I am so thankful for the choices I made! As I look at my children and grandchildren and see their love for God & neighbor, my reward is obvious…a heavenly paycheck with dividends! So a word to all you homemakers and stay-at-home moms (or dads): “staying with the gear” is a holy calling! If you lean on Him daily, you will someday reap rewards you had no idea were coming.

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